Airmid. . . celtic Irish goddess

Goddess of Sacred Herbs

Airmid is the ancient Irish Celtic Goddess of the Growing Greens of life. She is the Mother of Herbal Healers, Sacred Herbs, and all things connected to the art of healing. Airmid belonged to a family of healers among the Tuatha de Danaan of Ireland. She and her brothers, Miach and Diancecht, built the Well of Healing in Ireland, also called the Well of Slaine. She took care of this well which was said to restore health and vitality to the wounded, and the dead. The well had powerful healing properties, so much so that it restored life to the slain ancient warriors of Ireland. Airmid’s brother, Miach, was the God of Surgery. Her father, Diancecht, was God of Magick and Medicine, and played a powerful role to the Tuatha De Danaan. He was Chief of all Medicine and the Healing Arts, and it is no wonder that with that much knowledge of herbs, healing, and medicine, Airmid’s power went far beyond that of her father’s.

Herbalists in ancient Ireland held high places in their society. Women who were considered physicians of the tuatha, or tribe, were fiercely independent of their husbands and commanded their own status and position in their tribes. These ancient Pagans of Herbal Medicine were often referred to as Daughters of Airmid. But Airmid’s healing powers were not limited to just the body, but to the mind and spirit as well. That was shown in Her powers of restoring full health to the dead and dying.

Modern Irish Pagans believe Airmid still lives in their mountains of Ireland. She cures those who live in the kingdom of the ethereal such as fairies, gnomes, unicorns, sylkies, etc. She heals humans, too, helping them restore their waning health and cure the myriad of illnesses that us humans carry. Personally, I believe that Airmid is everywhere. She lives in our gardens; in herbal pots on our windowsills; in the grass we barely notice on maintained and manicured neighbourhood lawns. When we place lavender oil on our throbbing temples, we inhale the blessed scent of Airmid’s power. When we burn patchouli incense sticks, Airmid’s influence is there, rising up with the tiny swirls of smoke, reminding us of the power it brings of love, passion, and prosperity. Very little has ever been written about Airmid, but She is here. And with the rain, She will allow her sacred herbs to come forth, to grow, to heal, to inspire.

Source: http://theunicornopal.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/blessed-air